Fiction

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    76% Dhirenbabu [Rohan Roy] 170.00

    Author: Rohan Roy

    Publisher: D M Library

     

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    A Passage to India ( Unabridged Classics): The originals 147.00

    About The Book

    Life never gives us what we want at the moment that we consider appropriate. British author e.M. Forster novel, a passage to India (1924) is based on the authors impressions of India. He started writing the novel soon after his first visit to the country. The story, set in the 1920s, plays out against the backdrop of the Indian Independence movement. The title of the novel is inspired by American icon Walt Whitman 1870 poem, a passage to India. The novel revolves around four main Characters— Dr. Aziz, his British friend Mr. Cyril Fielding, Mrs. Moore, and Miss adela quest during a day trip to marabar caves, adela mistakenly believes Dr. Aziz is trying to assault her. Dr. Aziz’s ordeal after being falsely accused, the run-up to his trial, and its consequences highlight the underlying tensions between Indians and the British rulers of India of the time. Though foster managed to shine a light on race relations and power imbalances in India during the British Raj, he did not directly condemn colonialism and imperialism in a passage to India.

    About E.M. Forster

    Edward Morgan ForstEr (1879–1970), British novelist, essayist, short story writer and critic, was born at Marylebone, London. His architect father died when Forster was very young and he was brought up by his mother. Forster’s celebrated works include the novels A Room with a View (1908), Howards End (1910), A Passage to India (1924), and Maurice (1971) as well as a large corpus of criticism. Forster broke new ground by departing from the elaborate, flowery style of his predecessors and adopted a freer, more colloquial style in his books. His novels were seeped in social commentary, which was based on his in-depth observations of middle-class lives. He also had a deep-rooted interest in Mediterranean “paganism,” which called for humans to maintain their connection with the natural world and live a life attuned to the earth’s rhythms.

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    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man ( Unabridged Classics) : The Originals 113.00

    About The Book

    “The first novel by Irish writer, James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a coming-of-age tale about the religious and intellectual awakening of the protagonist. In this semi-autobiographical novel, Joyce examines what distinguishes the individual from the social, religious and cultural, by mapping the ever-changing landscape of the mind. Written in a modernist style, the novel traces the journey of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictitious alter ego of Joyce, with an allusion to the skilful craftsman and artist of Greek mythology. Stephen rebels against the Catholic and Irish mores that govern his upbringing, culminating in his self-imposed exile from Ireland to Europe. American modernist poet Ezra Pound had the novel serialised in the English literary magazine The Egotist in 1914 and 1915. Published as a book in 1916 by B.W. Huebsch of New York, Joyce’s debut novel earned him his place as a frontrunner of literary modernism.”

    About James Joyce

     

    Born on 2 February 1882 in Dublin, Ireland, James Joyce was one of the most revered writers of the 20th century. His masterpiece, Ulysses, remains an unparalleled literary feat. His exploration of language and his exceptional use  of the stream-of-consciousness technique immensely contributed to the modernist avant-garde, inspiring contemporary writers to experiment with  fresh perspective.
    A brilliant student, Joyce briefly attended the Christian Brothers-run O’Connell School before excelling at the Jesuit schools Clongowes and Belvedere. In 1904, in his early twenties, he emigrated permanently to continental Europe with his partner and future wife, Nora Barnacle. Though most of his life was spent in Trieste, Paris and Zurich, his fictional universe was largely set in Dublin, with characters who resembled his family members, acquaintances, friends and enemies. Joyce’s other well known works include Dubliners, a short-story collection; his first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, which caught the attention of the American poet, Ezra Pound, who praised him for his unconventional style and voice, and the masterly Finnegans Wake. Following the Nazi invasion of Paris, he and his family moved to southern France in 1940. On 13 January 1941, following an intestinal operation, the writer passed away in Zurich, where he is buried in the Fluntern cemetery.

     

    Other Books By James Joyce

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    A Room of One’s Own – Unabridged Classics (The Originals) 94.00

    About The Book

    A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction. A Room of One’s Own, among Virginia Woolf’s best- known works, is an extended essay, based on two lectures that she delivered in October 1928 at Newnham College and Girton College, women’s constituent colleges at the University of Cambridge. First published in September 1929 as a book, this seminal feminist text makes a case for a literal and figurative space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by men. Woolf feels strongly that the argument that women produce inferior works of literature must be analysed against the backdrop of their existence and circumstances—unlike men, historically and socially, women are denied the time, space and economic independence to produce artistic and creative works. Nearly a century after the publication of A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf’s observation still seems to ring true.

    About Virginia Woolf

    Born on 25 January 1882, Virginia Woolf was one of the most influential modernist 20th-century English writers, notable for using stream of consciousness as a literary technique in her works. While writing anonymous reviews for journals, she resolved to ‘re-form’ the novel by experimenting with dreams and delirium. Her novel Melymbrosia, which she completed in 1912 was born out of this determination. Recast and published in 1915 as The Voyage Out, it was about a young woman’s journey of selfdiscovery on her father’s ship in South America. Later, she modelled many of her characters on real-life associates and acquaintances.
    At the onset of 1924, the Woolfs moved their residence from the suburbs back to Bloomsbury, where a relationship blossomed between the aristocratic Vita Sackville-West and Virginia. With Sackville-West, she learned to face her anxieties and overcome her nervous ailments. In fact, Orlando, a fantastical biography is partly a portrait of Vita Sackville-West.
    One of the most important chapters in her early life was the summer home the family visited in St Ives, Cornwall, where she first beheld the Godrevy Lighthouse. To the Lighthouse (1927) is, therefore, considered one of her most autobiographical novels. Apart from her extremely popular extended essay, ‘A Room of One’s Own’ (1929), her other seminal works include-Mrs Dalloway (1925), Orlando (1928) and The Waves (1931).
    In 1941, Virginia Woolf drowned herself in a river, aged 59. Her last work, Between the Acts, was posthumously published later that year.
    Other Books By Virginia Woolf

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    A Room with a View – Unabridged English Classics (The Originals) 147.00

    About The Book

    It makes a difference doesn’t it, whether we fully fence ourselves in, or whether we are fenced out by the barriers of others? British writer E.M. Forster’s novel, A Room with a View (1908) revolves around Lucy Honeychurch, a young woman who lives in socially conservative Edwardian England. The story, set in Italy and England, is both a romance and a critique of English society in the early 1900s, when upper-middle class English women were starting to dream of leading more independent lives. Lucy’s journey to Italy with her prim and proper cousin, Charlotte Bartlett, is packed with adventure, romance, encounters with people from other cultures, and epiphanies. She falls in love with George Emerson during her stay in Italy, but back home in England, her fiancée is eagerly waiting for her return. Freedom and a whole range of possibilities beckon as Lucy tries to resolve the dilemma and build a new life for herself.

    About E.M. Forster

    Edward Morgan ForstEr (1879–1970), British novelist, essayist, short story writer and critic, was born at Marylebone, London. His architect father died when Forster was very young and he was brought up by his mother. Forster’s celebrated works include the novels A Room with a View (1908), Howards End (1910), A Passage to India (1924), and Maurice (1971) as well as a large corpus of criticism. Forster broke new ground by departing from the elaborate, flowery style of his predecessors and adopted a freer, more colloquial style in his books. His novels were seeped in social commentary, which was based on his in-depth observations of middle-class lives. He also had a deep-rooted interest in Mediterranean “paganism,” which called for humans to maintain their connection with the natural world and live a life attuned to the earth’s rhythms.

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    A Short History of The World ( Unabridged Classics): The Originals 222.00

    About The Book

    One of the founders of innovative science fiction novels, H.G. Wells was as taken up with the real world as his imaginary realm. Dissatisfied with the quality of history books at the end of World War I, the writer began penning his own history of the world. First published in 1922, A Short History of the World presents a groundbreaking study of the civilisation from the origins of the Earth—spanning the Neolithic Era, the rise of Judaism, the Golden Age of Athens, Christ’s life, the great discovery of America—to the consequences of World War I. Inspired by Wells’s The Outline of History (1919)—a work in three volumes, beginning with Prehistory and following the world’s significant events through World War I—this condensed work chronicles the physical, intellectual and spiritual evolution of the human race. Wells adopts a Darwinian approach and avoids presenting history within a politicised framework. Passionately told, A Short History of the World remains an evergreen classic.

    About H.G. Wells

     

    HERBERT GEORGE WELLS was born on 21 September 1866, in Bromley, England. In 1874, Wells, the son of domestic helpers-turned-shopkeepers, had an accident that left him bedridden for months. It was during this time that an avid reader was born. His father would bring him books from the local library and Wells would spend hours devouring the written word. Later, when his mother returned to working as a maidservant in a country house in Sussex, Wells found himself in the owner’s magnificent library, immersed in the works of stalwarts like Jonathan Swift, Charles Dickens, Sir Thomas More, Plato, Daniel Defoe and others. As a teenager, Wells worked as a draper’s assistant but eventually quit. Later, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science (later, the Royal College) where he learned about astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics, among other subjects. All through, Wells nursed the secret desire to become a writer someday. In 1895, following the publication of The Time Machine, Wells became an overnight sensation. The story of an English scientist developing a time travel machine earned him the title of Father of Futurism. Wells’ successive books, often termed as ‘scientific romances’ included The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897) and The War of the Worlds (1898) Wells’ works reflected the need for a society that flourished on the ideas and principles of global socialism. Published in 1920, The Outline of History is regarded as Wells’ best-selling work. A champion of social and political ideas, he also ran for Parliament as a Labour Party candidate between 1922 and 192 The visionary author, sociologist, journalist, and historian breathed his last on 13 August 1946, aged 79.
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    A Tale of Two Cities ( Unabridged Classics): The Originals 147.00

    About The Book

    It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness… The year was 1775 and Lucie Manette, a young self- sacrificing orphan, realised she had been living a lie. Her father, Doctor Manette, whom she had taken for dead was, in fact, alive. The self-exiled nephew of the Marquis Evrémonde, Charles Darnay was accused of treason in 1780; Madame Defarge, a victim of the French aristocracy, stitched a hidden registry of those condemned to die; and Sydney Carton, the brilliant yet dissolute alcoholic English lawyer in love with Lucie, were all battling the social ills that had besieged France and England. From the serene lanes of London, they were drawn against their will to the bloodstained streets of Paris at the peak of the Reign of Terror and soon the guillotine cast a lethal shadow over their lives. Originally published in 1859, in weekly instalments in All the Year Round, a British weekly literary magazine, A Tale of Two Cities is a masterpiece which captures the reader’s imagination through its haunting narrative of the French Revolution. A firm believer in the virtues of resurrection and transformation, Charles Dickens presents a moving account of sacrifice and redemption through his best-known work of historical fiction.

    About Charles Dickens

     

    Born on 7 February 1812, in Portsmouth, Charles Dickens was one of the greatest novelists of the Victorian era. He created some of the most intriguing fictional characters in literature. The author’s success began with the 1836 publication of the Pickwick Papers, following which he became an international celebrity. Known for his humour, satire and incisive representation of society through his characters, his literary triumphs include A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, and Great Expectations. A literary colossus of his time, he wrote 15 novels, 5 novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles. He even performed for Queen Victoria in 1851. Such was the charisma of the author that the term Dickensian, is still used to describe situations
    reminiscent of his narratives. Literary stalwarts like Leo Tolstoy, George Orwell and G.K. Chesterton admired him for his comedy, prose style and realism. The quintessential Victorian author died in 1870, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

     

    Other Books By Charles Dickens

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    Aalo Aadhari Jibonchhabi [Susmita Shil] 120.00

    Author: Susmita Seal

    Publisher: Mrittika Prakashan

    Binding: Paperback

    Category: Fiction, Poem

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    Abhyantarin [Pritha Samanta] 200.00

    Author: Pritha Samanta

    Publisher: Satkahon Publication

    Binding: Hardcover

    Genre: Non-fiction

    Category: Novel

    Language: Bengali

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    Agranthito Ajitesh [Bhabesh Das] 316.00
    • Author: Ajitesh Bandyopadhyay
    • Edited By: Bhabesh Das
    • Publisher: Nirjhar Publication
    • Language: Bengali
    • Binding: Hardcover
    • Year of Publishing: 2023
    • Genre: Fiction
    • Category: Play, Stories, Anthology
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